Judo betting at the 2020 Olympics

Like many combat sports, the more you know about the competitors the less chance of placing a losing judo bet. The most common in judo betting is the win bet in a particular match. Before placing a win bet online make sure you know the strengths and weaknesses of the two fighters and the head-to-head record. This could be a simple strategy to follow when betting on judo tournaments.

Keep up to date with judo news on ijf.org and teamusa will keep you informed of all the Olympics news. You can catch up with live action on the olympicchannel and NBC if you are looking for judo video streaming services in the USA.

Also popular in judo betting is a top three bet – pick a competitor who you think could win at least a bronze medal. This could prove good value with Japanese athletes who may fight far better than their ranking suggests with the home crowd behind them.

Check on American bookies like BetamericaPointsbetWill HillUnibet NJ/PAFox Bet and fanduel to check the latest judo odds online, predictions and special promotions.

A bit about judo and its Olympics history

Judo is one of the most popular martial arts with the aim to throw or take down your opponent.

It was created in Japan in the late 19th century and made its bow as a demonstration sport at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. However, it was 32 years later that it became an official Olympics sport and it wasn’t until Barcelona 1992 that women’s judo made its debut.

The event will be one the most hotly anticipated by the Japanese public and takes place at the Nippon Budokan Arena in Tokyo from July 25 to August 1. Unsurprisingly, given the sport’s origins, Japan dominates the medal table with 39 gold medals, nearly three times as many as the second most successful country, France.

Like boxing, the sport has various weight divisions with seven categories from heavyweight to extra lightweight. There will also be a new mixed event in Tokyo next year.

The US had a successful event in Rio but they are unlikely to repeat their successes in Japan with two-time gold medallist Kayla Harrison retiring. US Judo was also hit recently by the shock death of Jack Hatton, the 24-year-old was hopeful of competing at Tokyo 2020.

The Japanese competitors will all be determined to claim a medal with lightweight Shohei Ono one of their most outstanding athletes: the Rio gold medallist and three-times world champion is unbeaten since 2015 and is considered the best pound-for-pound fighter in the sport.

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