State law in Connecticut in 2020 does offer residents the ability to play the ponies online, however, and numerous licensed online sites offer wagering on a wide array of races, including regulated operators such as AmWager.com; BetAmerica.com; DRFBets.com and others. Bet on Kentucky Derby, Dubai World Cup, Preakness Stakes. Prix de L’Arc de Triomphe, The Breeders’ Cup, Epsom Derby and other events.

Unfortunately, there are no more horse race tracks operating in the state of Connecticut. However, the state has a rich history with the sport and it remains legal to play the ponies. Wagering is simply limited to online sites such as TVG and TwinSpires.

  • AmWager.com
  • BetAmerica
  • DRF Bets
  • ibetmohegan.com
  • KeenelandSelect
  • Mywinners.com
  • NYRA Bets
  • Twinspires
  • TVG
  • Xpressbet

In early 2019, lawmakers in the state were considering legislation to make casinos, off-track betting sites and the CT Lottery all operators of legal sports betting in Connecticut. That could significantly alter the betting landscape. Check mobile betting apps in Connecticut.

No horse racing tracks, but Racebook at Mohegun Sun

Connecticut, which does not have any horse racing tracks and is not known as a gambling state, has actually been at the forefront of several trends regarding U.S. betting. It was an early adopter of the off-track wagering, establishing a network where residents and visitors could wager on horse races from other states in 1976. It sold the network to Autotote Enterprises in 1993, which continues to operate it. 

Connecticut also played a leading role in the development of next-generation tribal gambling facilities with the opening of the Foxwoods Resort Casino by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe in 1992. The Mohegan Tribe opened the Mohegan Sun racebook four years later.

And the Constitution State also was one of the first seven states to expressly authorize advance deposit wagering – a form of betting that requires a player to fund an account before making bets – in 1999, along with Illinois, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania. Other states later followed. 

The state had a long history of horse racing dating to the 1800s, but anti-gambling legislation in 1925 caused even its most famous track, Charter Oak Park, to close. 

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